Noah Caldwell
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:59 pm

Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 1:47 pm

I have no idea how the file system is organized.

I mean, I know how it works and everything, I've traversed all around it in the terminal, but I don't know what goes where, i.e. where example code is, what opt and etc and var and all those folders contain. I wouldn't say I am a Linux newbie, but I would say I'm a familiar novice, and I don't know that. (Maybe it's just me, but Windows's clearly-labelled file system is much more intuitive, and may drive people away. I'm not sure I blame them, it really does seem daunting and dense.)

I don't expect someone to go through and label just for me every subfolder's subfolder in one forum post; I am merely pointing out that, while possible to figure out where things are by oneself, a heck of a lot of hassle and time could be saved if there was a simple tutorial out there that went through the easy stuff and showed anything important, i.e. example code. I didn't find anything readily available- if there is a tutorial done, perhaps things could be done to make it easier to find?

So write this up on the list of Things That Someone With The Knowledge Should Do.

Spider.007
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 11:24 am

Re: Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 1:53 pm

Your questions are by no means RPi specific. Therefore, I would advise reading some Linux basics documentations such as General overview of the Linux file system

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bob_binz
Posts: 441
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 7:58 pm
Location: Stockport, UK

Re: Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 2:04 pm

There's a brief list here that describes much of the top level stuff, if it's any use:

http://www.tuxfiles.org/linuxhelp/linuxdir.html

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stevepdp
Posts: 286
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 7:41 am

Re: Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 2:07 pm

Check the links on this post too.
Jam games and post-mortems: stevepdp.dev/games.html

Joe Schmoe
Posts: 4277
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:11 pm

Re: Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 2:09 pm

And some folks need to stop being fanboys and see the forest behind the trees.

(One of the best lines I've seen on this board lately)

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rurwin
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Re: Filesystem

Sat May 19, 2012 4:10 pm

/boot is the stuff directly concerned with booting.
/dev is the devices (serial ports, hard-drives, etc.)
/sys and /proc are pseudo filesystems. They allow access to the operating system using the file metaphor.
/etc are configuration files
/home is where the user's home directories are
/root is the home directory of the superuser
/var is for variable length files -- mail queues, printer queues and system logs.
/tmp is for temporary files and may be purged regularly.

/sbin is the executable files that are required for very early booting and for repairing a broken installation. This directory is available even if only the boot disk can be accessed.
/bin are the other executable files that are required for booting before networking is available.
/include are the C/C++ header files (.h).
/lib are the libraries (.lib)

/usr are the files that do not need to be accessible until after networking is up.
/usr/local are the files that have been installed locally (these days that means not using apt-get etc.)

There are bin, include, lib and maybe etc directories under /usr and /usr/local.

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RaspberryPie
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 3:49 pm
Location: florida

Re: Filesystem

Tue May 22, 2012 7:00 pm

rurwin wrote:/boot is the stuff directly concerned with booting.
/dev is the devices (serial ports, hard-drives, etc.)
/sys and /proc are pseudo filesystems. They allow access to the operating system using the file metaphor.
/etc are configuration files
/home is where the user's home directories are
/root is the home directory of the superuser
/var is for variable length files -- mail queues, printer queues and system logs.
/tmp is for temporary files and may be purged regularly.

/sbin is the executable files that are required for very early booting and for repairing a broken installation. This directory is available even if only the boot disk can be accessed.
/bin are the other executable files that are required for booting before networking is available.
/include are the C/C++ header files (.h).
/lib are the libraries (.lib)

/usr are the files that do not need to be accessible until after networking is up.
/usr/local are the files that have been installed locally (these days that means not using apt-get etc.)

There are bin, include, lib and maybe etc directories under /usr and /usr/local.
Great answer, +2
im sure that very succint answer will help out the windows users alot
A Raspberry a Day
Keep the Student at Play
So Get Your Slice of Pi
Let your programming Fly

ikarus342000
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2012 11:30 am

Re: Filesystem

Tue May 22, 2012 10:13 pm

Very clear clarification. Lets stay with postings in this spirit

B.K.

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